Susquehanna Antique Company - American Artists and Furniture

Benjamin Osro Eggleston, American 1867-1937

Benjamin Osro Eggleston, American 1867-1937


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Directory: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1930: Item # 1364220
SUSQUEHANNA Antique Company, Inc.
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 $4,200.00 
Oil on canvas. 24" x 30". Size in frame: 40" x 46". Frame is a custom carved and gilded Arts and Crafts Style frame. Bio from AskArt: Benjamin Osro Eggleston, born at Belvidere, Minnesota on January 22, 1867. During his elementary years, Benjamin demonstrated talent and he was encouraged through high school. Later, he moved to Red Wing, a picturesque town about forty miles from Minneapolis, on the Mississippi River, to open a studio for teaching and for painting portraits. Eggleston enrolled in the recently organized Minneapolis School of Fine Art where he studied under the portrait and history painter Douglas Volk (1856-1935), the son of the sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895). Douglas Volk came to Minneapolis in 1868 as first director of the Minneapolis School of Art, which was organized by the recently founded Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts. With some experience in draftsmanship and academic painting, Eggleston landed a job as staff artist for the Minneapolis Tribune (1886-87), and learned to sketch rapidly in order to seize the immediate impression of a scene or event. After about two years he became extremely ill and found it necessary to join his parents on their farmstead in Geneva, Ohio, for convalescence. In 1890 he moved to Brooklyn, where he continued to paint. Eggleston exhibited two figure subjects at the National Academy of Design in 1890 and at the Brooklyn Art Association in 1891, of which he became a member. In 1894, Eggleston sailed for Europe. He was in Paris in the mid-1890s when impressionism was still an influential movement. The impact proved inspirational. Eggleston's technique matured rapidly; indeed, eventually it resembled the late work of Edouard Manet in terms of his enthusiasm for the candid depiction of the Parisian bourgeoisie and for contemporary genre. Though at times his mannered realism was somewhat non-academic, Eggleston was not yet ready to adopt impressionism fully. Upon his return to Brooklyn in late 1896 or early 1897, Eggleston also exhibited his well known Soup Kitchen, Paris, at the National Academy.